The most common question I got was; ‘Oh, you are a criminal defence lawyer? How can you defend those people?’

“When I told my father that I wanted to be a lawyer he was delighted, but then I told him I wanted to be a criminal defence lawyer and he wasn’t as delighted anymore. You see, criminal lawyers in America are usually the bottom of the totem pole, and I knew that. But somehow I was always drawn to protecting the impoverished, I felt like I needed to be the underdog. It’s interesting that until ‘Making a Murderer’ came out, the most common question I got was; ‘Oh, you are a criminal defence lawyer? How can you defend those people?’ I had to explain that ‘those people’ aren’t always so different. They could be your son or your daughter or your best friend. Often a private meeting with them has left me thinking; ‘oh God I could have dinner with them, they are like my friends! How did they get caught up in this?’ The world we live in is not black and white. I had to learn very early in my career that there is law and there is justice. Both can only exist if people do their jobs right. But humanity makes mistakes all the time. The first mistake we always make is putting people in boxes and separating them from the rest of humanity just to create the illusion of justice.”