We are still in the discovery stage which means I don’t have many success stories to tell…

“I’ve been awarded a four-year grant from the Irish Cancer Society for a research project which looks at new ways of treating cancer patients so they not only survive but thrive after diagnosis. A big part of my work at the moment is setting up a clinic which will focus on the quality of life and nutrition after oesophageal cancer surgery. My research will pioneer a personalised approach, helping patients deal with the harsh effects of treatment. We are still in the discovery stage which means I don’t have many success stories to tell… So far, the most significant learning is the realisation of just how complex the issue is we are dealing with. Not only is it a very invasive surgery but the side effects are often so unbearable that it’s very challenging for people to adapt to eating again afterwards. It always struck a chord, when a patient tells me that if they had known this is how they were going to feel, they wouldn’t have chosen the life-saving surgery… Those patients are the driving force behind my work. I am committed to creating a future where my patients will have a very different view about their lives going forward.”

Dr Murphy’s research, funded in part by the donations raised on#DaffodilDay, aims to establish a model for oesophageal cancer survivor care that can be applied to post-treatment-care for a range of cancers. This post was highlighted by the Irish Cancer Society.

Please help people affected by cancer by buying a daffodil on the day or donating at www.cancer.ie/daffodilday